Event Title

Discovering the Phylogeny of the Genus Mirabilis

Presenter Information

Julia Olivieri, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

9-26-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

9-26-2014 1:20 PM

Poster Number

13

Abstract

This summer I studied the phylogeny of the genus Mirabilis to try to elucidate relationships within the group and learn more about the evolution of gypsum endemic species in the clade. I isolated DNA from some individuals using PhytoPure and CTAB procedures, and sequenced parts of the nuclear ITS, matK, ndhF, and ycf1 DNA regions for over fifty individuals using PCR. I then used Geneious to edit the sequences, and created phylogenetic trees using parsimony with my data. These trees suggest that the species Mirabilis nesomii, the only known gypsum endemic Mirabilis, may be polyphyletic. The specific adaptations necessary for living on gypsum might have caused morphological convergence that led to this mistaken classification.

Project Mentor(s)

Michael Moore, Biology

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Sep 26th, 12:00 PM Sep 26th, 1:20 PM

Discovering the Phylogeny of the Genus Mirabilis

Science Center, Bent Corridor

This summer I studied the phylogeny of the genus Mirabilis to try to elucidate relationships within the group and learn more about the evolution of gypsum endemic species in the clade. I isolated DNA from some individuals using PhytoPure and CTAB procedures, and sequenced parts of the nuclear ITS, matK, ndhF, and ycf1 DNA regions for over fifty individuals using PCR. I then used Geneious to edit the sequences, and created phylogenetic trees using parsimony with my data. These trees suggest that the species Mirabilis nesomii, the only known gypsum endemic Mirabilis, may be polyphyletic. The specific adaptations necessary for living on gypsum might have caused morphological convergence that led to this mistaken classification.