Event Title

Nucleophilic Addition of Atmospherically Relevant Anions to Aldehydes on Secondary Organic Aerosol

Presenter Information

Adam Hammer, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

9-26-2014 12:00 PM

End Date

9-26-2014 1:20 PM

Poster Number

14

Abstract

Gas-phase aldehydes are known to be significant intermediates in atmospheric reaction pathways. Addition of polar functional groups to aldehydes is known to produce less volatile products, which may condense on secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The composition of SOA in the atmosphere has been shown to influence the incidence of cardiovascular disease, weather patterns, and the Earth’s albedo, and thus addition reactions to aldehydes are linked to the issues of global health and climate change. The nucleophilic hydration of aldehydes to form less volatile diol products has been well studied. Recent work has suggested that nucleophiles other than water may attack carbonyl carbons. We will measure equilibrium constants and propose mechanisms for the addition of chloride, sulfate, and nitrate to aldehydes via nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analytical methods. This work will allow for a more detailed quantitative modeling of SOA in the atmosphere.

Project Mentor(s)

Matthew Elrod, Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Sep 26th, 12:00 PM Sep 26th, 1:20 PM

Nucleophilic Addition of Atmospherically Relevant Anions to Aldehydes on Secondary Organic Aerosol

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Gas-phase aldehydes are known to be significant intermediates in atmospheric reaction pathways. Addition of polar functional groups to aldehydes is known to produce less volatile products, which may condense on secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The composition of SOA in the atmosphere has been shown to influence the incidence of cardiovascular disease, weather patterns, and the Earth’s albedo, and thus addition reactions to aldehydes are linked to the issues of global health and climate change. The nucleophilic hydration of aldehydes to form less volatile diol products has been well studied. Recent work has suggested that nucleophiles other than water may attack carbonyl carbons. We will measure equilibrium constants and propose mechanisms for the addition of chloride, sulfate, and nitrate to aldehydes via nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analytical methods. This work will allow for a more detailed quantitative modeling of SOA in the atmosphere.